Twin foetuses reach out to each other at 14 weeks

Twin fetuses learn how to be social in the womb
October 13, 2010 by Lin Edwards Twin fetuses learn how to be social in the womb

Types of movements. a, Video frame representing a self-directed movement towards the mouth. b, Video frame representing a self-directed movement towards the eye. c, Video frame representing the foetus reaching towards and “caressing” the back of the sibling. d, Video frame representing the foetus reaching towards and “caressing” the head of the sibling. Image credit: PLoS ONE doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0013199

(PhysOrg.com) -- Humans have a deep-seated urge to be social, and new research on the interactions of twins in the womb suggests this begins even before babies are born.

The study, which was published in the Public Library of Science One (PLoS One), used four-dimensional ultrasonography to make 3D videos of twins at 14 and 18 weeks of gestation. The five pairs of twins were found to be reaching for each other even at 14 weeks, and making a range of contacts including head to head, arm to head and head to arm. By the time they were at 18 weeks, they touched each other more often than they touched their own bodies, spending up to 30 percent of their time reaching out and stroking their co-twin.

http://www.physorg.com/news/206164323-twin-fetuses-social-womb.html

and http://www.wired.com/wiredscience/2010/10/social-babies/

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